brain overload…

Posted: September 1, 2016 at 5:44 pm

too much stuff filtering thru my head in the past day or two.

whatever.

my biggest worry was the arrival of the one year old blind/deaf border collie. i have been playing various scenarios on how that would go, over and over in my head.
i am not going to lie, from the moment i said yes, i started feeling increasingly amounts of regret.
this is not a simple love a dog and care for her well.
this is a dog who can’t hear or see..virtually with no ability for 2 way communication..with me or anyone else, including the other dogs except for touch. and we are talking a young, active, agile border collie not someone who is all that staid and stationary. this is a dog who moves and thinks quickly, faster than me for sure.
in a communal shelter this translates into BIG responsibilities..to keep her safe, from others and herself, to keep her well, to keep her happy and joyfully engaged..and to find her a home if we can.
what was i thinking?
i honestly don’t know.

ok, i do know.

she was out of options.
she is an innocent babe, born blind and deaf because some moron bred two blue merle’s together and consigned her in utero to darkness and silence for the entirety of all her days.
and in just over one year of that life…2 different families, the spca and now saints makes this her 4th sort of home.
life can be very unfair to a sweet helpless dog.

so this morning she arrived at my somewhat nervous and regretful door.
and when i saw her, all regrets disappeared.
she needed us and we are here.

will it be 100% smooth sailing? yeah..no. she is a blind and deaf one year old border collie. oh my freaking doG!

it was a bit of a honeymoon for the first couple of hours. but all of this was so new to her…so much that couldn’t be seen or heard, nothing familiar or predictable. by the mid afternoon, it became a bit overwhelming to her.
so we have taken a step back…given freye her own space where she can safely relax. she has been kenneled for several months now and is not yet ready to take over the whole of saints world. but in time she will.
we have time. she has time. no rush to get anywhere at all…all of the time, patience, adventures and cuddles are here for this amazing young and disabled dog.
in the meantime…
she is a sweet, sweet dog and all of us are totally in love…… again.
freye

welcome freye. it might be a bit of a challenge but we are ready, willing and able to help you conquer your new world.

11 Comments on "brain overload…"

  • alyson nerker says

    Welcome Freye. Home is where the heart is.

  • Penny says

    She’s beautiful!

  • Rae says

    Thank you Carol for allowing Freya to come home to you. I had a dog very similar to Freya I called him Spirit and everyday he was with me I was amazed. He was also born blind and deaf but managed to create a life for himself with my herd. He housetrained himself and soon figured out where everything was and got around without any problems. He slept in a crate each night and routines and sameness were very important. He was with me for 6 years until he began having so many seizures that his quality of life was diminished quickly. The biggest problem we had was Spirite inability to read social que’s from the other dogs. I nitially I didn’t leave him alone with the others as I didn’t trust them not to beat him up if he bumped into them accidentally. Good luck to all of you especially Freya ❤️

  • Brenda says

    Freye is beautiful…welcome sweetheart. I was wondering if Mystic might be a good friend and playmate for her….on her own…..at least to start with. I’m sure you’ve gone over every scenario Carol. Can’t wait to meet her…(is it pronounced Free or Fry?)

  • Erin says

    It’s Freya (fray-yah) but spelled Freye. Maybe a French twist? My daughter is Phaedre but sounds like Phaedra. I like to think it adds some sophistication 🙂

  • Brenda says

    Oh, thanks Erin……I like the pronunciation of Freye now…..and Phaedre is a stunning name too.😊

  • Nancy says

    What a sweet face, and Freye is a lovely name. Our little dog is also blind and deaf, we use smell for cues quite a bit, gently blowing in his face so he knows who it is. We also put throw rugs all around the house so he can feel where he is and gets grounded that way. We started putting a little shirt on him at night, as he didn’t know when the lights were out and wanted to party in the middle of the night…now he knows it’s night time when his shirt goes on, and he sleeps right through. And lots of gentle touches so he knows someone is nearby…but because he can’t hear he can get quite loud, a kind of yowl, when he’s looking for his family, it’s quite funny. I’m sure Freye will have her own quirky little habits too. What a sweetie.

  • Barbara says

    What a gorgeous dog. I am glad that you have given Freye a chance at a good life, with love and touches and food and warmth. As always that big heart of yours and all the Saints volunteers will make her feel good.
    Thanks for taking her in.

  • Renee Hope Twaddle says

    This is my first contact with your website. I’m very touched by your loving post about Freye and the sweet comments. My sister had a blind collie and she was very precious. I hope all goes smoothly. Bless all of you! ♡

  • Mo says

    Welcome Freye…I believe this is a Viking name..a brave soul with a strong heart and spirit. She is beautiful .

  • Fiona says

    Don’t know if this group could help out with some insight

    http://www.pawstoadopt.com/blindanddeafdogs/

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